10 February 2016 | Online since 2003

Students benefit from farms restructure



29 January 2010 06:04:41|Education,News

Students benefit from farms restructure


Writtle College has restructured its farming operation in partnership with large local farming company Essex Farms in a move that will give students access to a substantially increased area of arable land in addition to the existing expanded and enhanced livestock enterprises.
Head of the School of Sustainable Environments Caroline Flanagan said: "The restructure has been designed to ensure an excellent long term proposition which works equally well for the College’s commercial farming operation and, most importantly, for our students to have access to an extensive range of field laboratories."
Given the College’s geographical position within East Anglia ’the UK’s breadbasket’, the emphasis is on leading on an arable focus and underpinning this with ventures that will add value both commercially and within the education portfolio.
Via a partnership with Essex Farms, who will contract-farm the College’s arable land in addition to their own large local landholdings, there will be access to a further 1800 hectares to students and staff for visits, research and field scale trials.

"We will now be able to demonstrate best practice with modern machinery on a large scale" said Caroline.
Alongside the arable focus, has been a rescoping of the livestock provision. The College has capitalised its Red Poll herd for an undisclosed sum and is acquiring 50 head for its finishing beef unit. The first 25 are due to arrive shortly with the second 25 arriving in the second year. The pig unit is being repositioned to allow greater emphasis on research and a brand new sow house is being constructed which marks a £200k investment from the College in the operation. The sheep flock remains unchanged at 90 commercial ewes.
"The investment in the future of the farming operation is very timely given the College’s renewed emphasis on our agriculture portfolio which is to include the introduction of a new MSc in Arable Crop Management starting in the Autumn of 2010.
"Increasingly Writtle is attracting high calibre undergraduate and masters students who are going on to make an important contribution both in the UK and internationally" said Caroline.

Download





0 Comment


Name

Please enter your name


Email

Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment

World News

India | 10 February 2016
Smallest Indian wheat crop in six years to spur imports

India may harvest its smallest wheat crop in six years after two successive years of below-average monsoon rainfall stresses crops, potentially opening its doors to more imports. Production is set ...


Ireland | 10 February 2016
Another volatile year ahead for farmers

Northern Ireland's agri-food sector was another volatile year ahead, Danske Bank has said. The institution held its annual Agri Economic Outlook Breakfast yesterday and heard about "multiple threat...


USA | 10 February 2016
California farmers reap record sales in record drought

A new state report shows California farmers reaping record sales despite the epic drought, thriving even as city-dwellers have been forced to conserve water, household wells have run dry and fish have...


Ireland | 10 February 2016
Dairy farmers: Don't use the milk price as an excuse to compromise on herd welfare

Spring calving season is now in full flight on the majority of dairy farms. In excess of one million calves will be born on Irish dairy farms between February and April. Great strides have been mad...


USA | 10 February 2016
Rise In cattle numbers driving down beef prices

Matt Stockton, an ag economist for UNL's West Central Research and Extension Center says the rising number of cattle is driving down price. "When prices are first recognized and start going up the ...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed

Farms and Land for sale


Holiday Rentals search



Top stories you may have missed
Username
Password