Rural Accommodation

Rakefoot Farm

B&B
£25.00
 -  £40.00
Notes : per person per night
Rakefoot Farm
Thornley Road, Chaigley
Clitheroe
BB7 3LY
Enjoy England Four Stars
Please mention FarmingUK when enquiring about accommodation

Rakefoot Farm Pictures

Description

Owner Information
Pat Gifford
Lancashire
Phone : +44 (0)7889 279063
Family farm peacefully situated in beautiful Forest of Bowland countryside in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, rich in wildlife. Ideally situated for walking, cycling or touring Lakes, Dales and Coast. Fishing, golf and horse-riding nearby. Explore historic towns of Skipton, Clitheroe and Longridge or numerous pretty villages.

Shop at local craft fayres, traditional factory outlets, Farmers' Markets and street stalls or the cities of Lancaster to the north, Manchester, Preston and Liverpool to the south and Leeds and York to the east.

Visit the coastal resorts of Southport, Blackpool or Morecambe or spend the day in the Lakes. Being only 9 miles to jct 31a of M6 gives easy access to M55 and M65.

Warm welcome for holiday or business guests, refreshments on arrival. Bed and breakfast and Self-catering in 17thC farmhouse and traditional stone barn conversion. Panoramic views, Woodburning stoves, exposed beams and stonework with the comforts of modern day living.

Most bedrooms en suite, some ground floor. Excellent home-cooked meals service using local produce when possible and pub/restaurants nearby. Indoor games room. Garden. Garde Laundry. Past winner of NWTB Silver Award for Self-Catering Holiday of the year.

Maps

Things to see and do in Lancashire

Pendle Hill
Pendle Hill

History and legend has woven a spell over Pendle. Pendle Hill rises above this ancient hunting ground, once the home of wolves and wild boar and to this day dotted with tiny hamlets and farms. It is still an untamed place, full of mystery and infamous as the home of the Pendle Witches who were tried and executed for witchcraft in 1612. The landscape, carved out by man and by nature, welcomes walkers and countryside enthusiasts. Long distance walks, such as the 43-mile Pendle Way and parts of the Bronte Way, combine history with stunning scenery, with plenty of country inns and farmhouses to provide most congenial rest and refreshment along the way.
Samlesbury Hall
Samlesbury Hall

Samlesbury Hall is a black and white, oak-timbered medieval manor-house dating from 1325. Decorated with distinctive quatrefoils and wattle and daub infill. Other features include chapel, Long Gallery and Minstrels Gallery with bow-fronted window. The Hall is home to displays, craft exhibitions and now hosts the work of Sir Charles Holmes. Said to be haunted by Lady Dorothy. The Long Gallery, annex and Southworth Rooms. The Hall is also available for weddings and events, it has a licence for civil ceremonies. The gardens are extensive and beautiful.
Harris Museum and Art Gallery
Harris Museum and Art Gallery

Go beyond the grandeur exterior of the Harris Museum in Preston’s city centre and you’ll be rewarded by a delightful mixture of contemporary and traditional art that’s completely free to visit. Head up the dramatic staircase to explore two floors of art ranging from unusual textile prints of the 20th century to more the more traditional fine art of the 19th century, including water colours by JMW Turner and Samuel Palmer. The new and frequently changing exhibitions make sure there is never a dull moment and kids will be keen to join in the Hands on Gang activities and events. At the end of your trip to the Harris Museum don’t forget to call in the café – the inspirational setting and views up to the Egyptian balcony will leave you in awe.
Manchester Art Gallery
Manchester Art Gallery

The gallery houses the civic art collection of Manchester. Its collections include works by artists such as Degas, Turner, Reynolds, Gauguin, Renoir and Landseer.
Manchester Town Hall
Manchester Town Hall

Manchester Town Hall is a Victorian-era, neo-gothic municipal building in Manchester, England. The building functions as the ceremonial headquarters of Manchester City Council and houses a number of local government departments. Completed by architect Alfred Waterhouse in 1877, the building features imposing murals by the artist Ford Madox Brown depicting important events in the history of the city. The Town Hall was rated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building in 1952 and the Town Hall Extension, completed in 1938, was Grade II* listed in 1974.
Pleasure Beach Blackpool
Pleasure Beach Blackpool

Pleasure Beach Blackpool is a family owned amusement park situated along the Fylde coast in Blackpool, England. It is the most visited amusement park in the United Kingdom.
Blackpool Zoo
Blackpool Zoo

Blackpool Zoo is top of the list of where to go and what to do in Lancashire. With over 1500 animals, it's a great family day out. The Zoo also welcomes schools, groups and educational trips and offers wheelchair-friendly access. Fun and wild animals combine for a memorable, value for money day out.
Manchester Opera House
Manchester Opera House

The Opera House in Quay Street, Manchester, England is a 1,920 seater commercial touring theatre which plays host to touring musicals, ballet, concerts and a spectactular Christmas pantomime. It is the sister to the Palace Theatre which is a similar venue in nearby Oxford Street at its junction with Whitworth Street. It is a Grade II listed building.
Gawthorpe Hall
Gawthorpe Hall

An Elizabethan gem in the heart of industrial Lancashire, built between 1600 and 1605 Gawthorpe Hall was the family seat of the Shuttleworth family for over 300 years. Inside the house you will find period rooms on display from the 1850 remodelling by renowned architect Sir Charles Barry and Pugin as well as original plasterwork ceilings, panelling and the impressive Long Gallery.
Manchester Museum of Science and Industry
Manchester Museum of Science and Industry

Located on the historic site of the world’s oldest surviving passenger railway station, housed in five listed buildings, MOSI’s amazing galleries and outstanding collections tell the story of Manchester’s scientific and industrial past, present and future. It is a large museum devoted to the development of science, technology, and industry and particularly the city's considerable contributions to these. It is an Anchor Point of ERIH — The European Route of Industrial Heritage.