Rural Accommodation

Bradley Burn Cottages

Self Catering
£220.00
 -  £660.00
Notes : per week
Bradley Burn Cottages
Bradley Hall, Wolsingham
Weardale
DL13 3JH
Email ID: 
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Bradley Burn Cottages Pictures

Description

Owner Information
Judith Stephenson
County Durham
Phone : +44 (0)1388 527285
Welcome to Bradley Burn Farm in Weardale, County Durham, North East England. Bradley Burn Farm is home to a farm shop and café selling a great range of local and homemade food, four self-catering holiday cottages and a static holiday caravan park.

The Bradley Burn is a tributary of the River Wear. Rising on the moors above Wolsingham, the stream flows down through the farm to meet the river in lower Weardale. On the eastern edge of the North Pennines, and in the heart of the Durham Dales, Bradley Burn Farm offers beautiful scenery and a peaceful environment - an ideal place to enjoy the countryside. Rural tranquility at its best!

Our holiday cottages are situated around sunny courtyards close to the Burn. Look out for herons, kingfishers or eels, or just sit and enjoy the water rippling past. Granary Cottage is ideal for families; the others are perfect for couples. All have been sensitively converted from traditional stone farm buildings and are comfortably furnished with all the facilities of a modern home. We have a games room with table tennis and pool, and books, games and DVDs to borrow.

Bed linen, towels and tea towels are all supplied and beds are made up for your arrival. We normally use duvets, but sheets and blankets can be substituted on request. Cots and high chairs are all available if we are notified in advance, and a single folding bed can be provided. Please note the cottages are all non-smoking.
Access to Golf Course 
Accept Children 
Baby Sitting 
Dish Washer 
Facilities for Children 
Fishing Nearby 
Freezer 
Ground Floor Bedroom 
Laundry Facilities 
Microwave 
Pets Accepted 
Tennis Court 
Working Farm 
Public Telephone 
BBQ 
Fridge 
Garden Patio 
Gym 
Pony Trekking 
Cycle Hire Available 
Cycle Storage 
Linen Provided 
Pool 
Parking On-Site 
Pool Table 

Maps

Things to see and do in County Durham

Broom House Farm
Broom House Farm

The farm house is on the top of the hill, but the farmland itself rolls down the valley to the River Browney. Broom House is really a livestock farm - although some arable crops such as barley, oats, peas, turnips and broad beans are grown - with the aim of producing our own feed for the animals. We have a herd of beautiful Aberdeen Angus cattle, as well as a large flock of Lleyn sheep and a small herd of Saddleback pigs as well as a flock of laying hens. The aim is to breed all our own replacement animals on the farm, enabling us to improve the quality of our livestock through breeding.
Durham Cathedral
Durham Cathedral

Durham Cathedral is the greatest Norman building in England, perhaps even in Europe. It is cherished not only for its architecture but also for its incomparable setting. For this reason it was inscribed together with the Castle as one of Britain's first World Heritage Sites. In a nationwide BBC poll held in 2001 it was voted the nation's best-loved building. Like Hadrian's Wall and the Angel of the North, it is an icon of north-east England, its image is instantly recognisable to people who love this part of Britain.
Beamish Museum
Beamish Museum

Beamish is a world famous open air museum telling the story of the people of North East England at two important points in their history – 1825 and 1913. In 1825, the region was rural and thinly populated. The Industrial Revolution, particularly the coming of the railways, accelerated change. By 1913 the heavy industries of the region were at their peak. Beamish stands in 300 acres of beautiful County Durham countryside, eight miles south west of Newcastle upon Tyne, twelve miles north west of Durham city. It is not a traditional museum.
The National Railway Museum at Shildon
The National Railway Museum at Shildon

Locomotion: The National Railway Museum at Shildon officially opened in 2004 and is the first National Museum in the North East of England.The premier railway museum contains many exciting exhibits. It is located on a 6 hectare site incorporating historic monuments and buildings full of interactive displays and an eco-friendly building 'Collection' which houses up to 60 vehicles, many from the National Collection. The museum also includes a play area, picnic area, modern art monument, gift shop and cafe.
Bowes Museum
Bowes Museum

Visitors to The Bowes Museum today can marvel at the fascinating collections but can also enjoy an exciting programme of exhibitions. Activities in the park and a superb café and shop have helped bring the museum singing and dancing into the 21st century. The magnificent legacy that John and Joséphine left to the people of Teesdale has been cared for to retain its charm and intrigue yet sympathetic developments have made the attraction a popular, vibrant and exciting day out for all.
Hall Hill Farm
Hall Hill Farm

Set in the beautiful, rolling hills of County Durham, Hall Hill Farm is an award winning mixed farm of 290 hectares. There are lots of friendly animals waiting to meet you. Bottle feed the lambs, fluffy chicks, inquisitive goats, the magnificent Highland Cattle and the children's favourite, rabbits and guinea pigs to cuddle and stroke.
Durham Heritage Centre and Museum
Durham Heritage Centre and Museum

A local history museum housed in a historic church close to the cathedral. The exhibition tells the story of Durham from the 10thC to the present day using displays, artefacts, models and videos. The museum also has a programme of regularly changing temporary exhibitions and an education service providing special activities for school visits. Brass rubbing is also available and there is a gift shop with refreshments.
Tanfield Railway
Tanfield Railway

A 3-mile steam railway and the oldest existing railway in the world, based on a section of the 1725 Tanfield Waggonway Trains with variety of 100-year-old Victorian carriages. Travel into the scenic Causey Woods where the 1727 Causey Arch bridge is the centre piece in a deep valley with many walks and display boards giving the 18thC railway history of the area. Back at Marley Hill shed, the oldest working engine shed in Britain, built in 1854, a large collection of locally built and used locomotives can be seen. Please see website or ring for dates and operating times.
Raby Castle
Raby Castle

The dramatic 14thC castle built by the mighty Nevilles has been home to Lord Barnard's family since 1626. In the well-preserved halls and chambers history comes vibrantly to life. Throughout the castle the rooms display fine furniture, impressive artwork and elaborate architecture.Visitors can also enjoy the deer park, large walled gardens, coach and carriage collection, woodland adventure playground, picnic area and gift shop. Part of the stables has been converted to a tearoom where former stalls have been incorporated to create an atmospheric setting. Events take place throughout the summer.